10 Ferraris You Probably Never Heard Of

10 Ferraris You Probably Never Heard Of

With over 350 different Ferrari models produced since 1947, it’s hard to keep track of them all.

A complete list of every Ferrari produced can be found here.

1953 Ferrari 625 TF Berlinetta

1953 Ferrari 625 TF Berlinetta

The 1953 Ferrari 625 TF Berlinetta was based on the 625 TF Spider. Coachbuilder Vignale produced two of those Spiders and just one Coupe. The history of this Coupe is pretty much unknown.

1955 Ferrari 857 S

1955 Ferrari 857 S

An early Ferrari race car that was equipped with a 3432 cc  engine – the largest inline four-cylinder engine at the time. In 1955 , it competed in races such as the Tourist Trophy at Goodwood and the Targa Florio in Italy. Only three were produced.

1956 Ferrari 250 GT Geneve Cabriolet by Boano

1956 Ferrari 250 GT Geneve Cabriolet by Boano

An interesting one designed by Felice Mario Boano. He was known for his flamboyant designs and the Ferrari 250 GT Geneva Cabriolet is no exception. Based on a regular 250 GT Cabriolet, the car underwent a drastic makeover. The most obvious change was a set of curved fins placed on the rear of the car. Moreover, you will see redesigned front and rear areas, with more abrupt angles as opposed to the flowing lines of the regular car.

1966 Ferrari 330 GT Fantuzzi Spyder

1966 Ferrari 330 GT Fantuzzi Spyder

As proven in our shooting brake article, Luigi Chinetti wasn’t shy about converting standard Ferraris to one-off or highly limited cars. The 1966 Ferrari 330 GT Fantuzzi Spyder is another one of his creations. The car started life as a regular Ferrari 250 GT/E in September 1960 before Carrozeria Fantussi replaced its body in Italy six year later. Various design aspects of then-new Ferraris, such as the 275 GTB and 250 P, were used.

1968 Ferrari 250 P5 Berlinetta Speciale

1968 Ferrari 250 P5 Berlinetta Speciale

This early Ferrari study model was designed by Pininfarina and introduced at the 1968 Geneva Motor Show. Ferrari built the car using a 330 P4 chassis and engine, and it had a great influence on how the marque approached aerodynamics.

1969 Ferrari 330 GTS Targa by Harrah

1969 Ferrari 330 GTS Targa by Harrah

A car so beautiful it graced the cover of Road & Track in December 1969. This car started life as a Ferrari 330 GTS purchased new by William Fisk Harrah, who was the Ferrari distributor for the western United States. Harrah, who amassed his wealth in the hotel and casino industry, had a private collection of more than 1,400 cars, including many one-off projects. That was also his intention with the 330 GTS. Once it arrived in Nevada, his mechanics immediately started working on the conversion.

Although he and his wife, Bobbie Gentry, preferred to drive closed-cockpit cars, they made a Targa version. This let them enjoy the weather and the sound of that Colombo V12 while still surrounded by bodywork. However, this open-air project is now extinct: When Ferrari became aware of the conversion, they were just about to cancel plans for a limited run of 20 Targa 330s because the car was nearing the end of its lifecycle, while Harrah’s GTS was reportedly converted back to its original state in 2015.

1971 Ferrari 3Z Spider

1971 Ferrari 3Z Spider

The Ferrari 3Z Spider would be the first collaboration between Ferrari and Zagato in 20 years. Designed by Giuseppe Mittino and commissioned by Luigi Chinetti, the car started life as a 250 GT California Short Wheelbase (s/n 2491GT). A massive transformation followed, and the result was not only revolutionary, but also quite similar to the Ferrari 365 GTC/4 that was unveiled later that year.

1981 Ferrari 308 GTB Carma FF

1981 Ferrari 308 GTB Carma FF

The Carma FF was a Group 5 contender based on a road-going 308 GTB. It was driven by Carlo Facetti and Martino Finotto during the 1981 24 Hours of Daytona. Facetti engineered the car himself and equipped the V8 engine with twin-turbochargers and a Kugelfisher fuel injection. Due to race regulations, the engine produced between 750 and 840 bhp, but it could have reached a power output of approximately 950 bhp at full boost. The car's first race was the 1981 24 Hours of Daytona, where it qualified sixth overall and set the fastest lap time but had to retire because of a faulty radiator. The Carma FF remains the only Group 5 Ferrari 308 GTB built.

1983 Ferrari 400i Meera S by Michelotti

1983 Ferrari 400i Meera S by Michelotti

The 1983 Ferrari 400i Meera S was the last Ferrari built by Michelotti and a bold way to say goodbye. The car was commissioned by the then-king of Arabia’s son and boasted a variety of unusual features, such as an electric sunroof, rear video-monitoring, wipers on every window and a state-of-the-art sound-system.

1989 Ferrari Colani Testa D'Oro

1989 Ferrari Colani Testa D'Oro

The 1989 Ferrari Colani Testa D'Oro was developed by German designer Luigi Colani to set speed records at the Bonneville Salt Flats. Unfortunately, it never managed to set a new World Record for the highest speed by a road-legal car, but it did win its class at Bonneville in 1991, with a top speed of 351 kph (218 mph). Its radical design featured blue bucket seats reminiscent of the 1960s Ferrari race cars and a 12-cylinder engine pushing out over 750 bhp and 900 Nm of torque.

Do you know of any unheard Ferraris? Join the conversation here.

Written by Max Lammers.


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