Dictionary

A

AAC

AAC (Auto-Avio Costruzioni) supplied parts to other racing teams and was founded by Enzo Ferrari in 1939 when he left Alfa Romeo.

 

Aperta

Aperta is Italian for ‘open’. Ferrari used this term on convertible cars such as the LaFerrari Aperta.

B

Barchetta

Barchetta is Italian for ‘little boat’. Ferrari used this term on convertible cars such as the 166 MM Barchetta.

 

BB

BB is an abbreviation for Berlinetta Boxer. Ferrari first used this term on the 365 GT4 BB, which was powered by a flat-12. Some say it's actually an abbreviation for Brigitte Bardot, a French model/actress.

 

BBi

BBi is an abbreviation for Berlinetta Boxer injection and was used on the 1981 512BBi because of its updated Berlinetta Boxer engine with a Bosch K-Jetronic CIS fuel injector.

 

Berlinetta

Berlinetta is Italian for ‘little saloon’. Ferrari uses this term on cars with a more comfortable ride such as the F12berlinetta.

C

Can Am

Can Am is an abbreviation for Canadian-American Challenge Cup, a racing series held from 1966 till 1987. Ferrari used the term on race cars such as the 712 Can Am.

 

Challenge Series

The Ferrari Challenge was founded in 1993 for 348 owners who wanted to race their cars. Ferrari currently organizes championships for the USA, Asia-Pacific and Europe.

 

Competizione

Competizione is Italian for ‘competition’. Ferrari used this term on racing cars such as the F40 Competizione.

D

Dino

Dino was a separate marque for which Ferrari produced V6 (and later V8) cars. It was founded in 1968 and ceased in 1976. The name was derived from Enzo Ferrari’s son, Alfredo ‘Dino’ Ferrari.

E

Evoluzione

Evoluzione or Evo is Italian for ‘evolution’. Ferrari uses this term on updated XX cars such as the FXX Evo.

 

Europa

Europa refers to EU-spec cars such as the 250 Europa.

 

Export

Export refers to racing versions of the Ferrari 212.

F

Fiorano

Fiorano refers to Ferrari’s own test track Pista di Fiorano. This term was also used on the Ferrari 599 GTB Fiorano.

G

GT

GT is an abbreviation for Gran Turismo and refers to comfortable long-distance cars, such as the California.

 

GTA

GTA is an abbreviation for Gran Turismo Automatic. Ferrari used this term on the 456 GTA which sported a four-speed transmission.

 

GTB

GTB is an abbreviation for Gran Turismo Berlinetta. Ferrari uses this term for their mid-engine grand tourers such as the 488 GTB.

GTBi The B and i in GTBi stand for Berlinetta and injection, respectively. It was used on the 1980 308 GTBi which featured the Bosch K-Jetronic reduce emissions.

 

GTC

GTC is an abbreviation for Gran Turismo Coupe. Ferrari uses this term for a select few grand-tourers such as the 330 GTC.

GTE GTE stands for Grand Touring Endurance and is used for racing cars like the Ferrari 488 GTE. They are specifically developed for endurance racing such as the 24 Hours of Le Mans.
GT/E GT/E was used for the Ferrari 250 GT 2+2, but to differentiate the models the car was quickly dubbed as the 250 GT/E 2+2. The letter E came from the new chassis type (508E) and engine type (128E) and has no specific meaning, other than the continuation of chassis/engine types that were specified with letters on alphabetic order.

 

GTi

GTi is an abbreviation for Gran Turismo injection. Ferrari used this term on the 400 GTi and the injection refers to the updated Bosch K-Jetronic fuel injection system.

 

GTO

GTO stands for Gran Turismo Omologato. Ferrari used this term on three of their homologated road cars.

 

GTS

GTS is an abbreviation for Gran Turismo Spider. Ferrari used this term on several V8-mid-engine cars, such as the 308 GTS.

GTSi The S and i in GTSi stand for Spider and injection, respectively. It was used on the 1980 308 GTSi which featured the Bosch K-Jetronic reduce emissions.

 

GTZ

GTZ is an abbreviation for Gran Turismo Zagato. The Italian design-house Zagato used this term for the 1 of 6 Ferrari 575 GTZ.

 

GT3

GT3 is an abbreviation for Grand Tourer Group 3. Ferrari uses this term on their Group 3 racing cars such as the 488 GT3.

 

GT4

GT4 is an abbreviation for Gran Turismo 4 [seats]. Ferrari used this term on the 2+2 Dino 308 GT4 and 208 GT4.

H

HGTE

HGTE is an abbreviation for Handling Gran Turismo Evoluzione. Ferrari used this term on the 599 GTB with HGTE package, which improved the car’s handling.

 

HS

HS is an abbreviation for Handling Speciale. Ferrari used this term on the California T with HS package, which improved the car’s handling.

I

Inter

Inter refers to road-going versions of the Barchetta racing cars. The name came from Scuderia Inter, one of the earliest racing teams that bought Ferraris to compete.

L

LM

LM is an abbreviation for Le Mans. Ferrari used this term on a few of their LM-competing racing cars.

 

Lusso

Lusso is Italian for ‘luxury’. Ferrari uses this term on their larger and more luxurious cars such as the 250 GT Lusso.

M

Maranello

Maranello is the Italian city that is home to the Ferrari factories and museum. Ferrari used this name on a car with the introduction of the 550 Maranello.

 

Modena

Modena is the Italian city where Enzo Ferrari was born in 1898. Ferrari used this name on a car with the introduction of the 360 Modena.

Monospecchio Monospecchio means ‘single mirror’ in Italian. It’s an unofficial way to refer to single mirror Testarossas, which were produced from 1984 through 1986.

 

MM

MM is an abbreviation for Mille Miglia, an Italian open-road, endurance race held from 1927 to 1957. Ferrari used this term on their Mille Miglia developed cars such as the 290 MM.

 

Mondial

Mondial is French for ‘global’. Ferrari used this term on a few cars, including the 500 Mondial and the 308/208 GT4 replacement. The 500 was a very successful sports car used in the 1950s and the Mondial received the name after Ferrari won four Formula 1 World Constructors Championships in the 1970s.

 

Monza

Monza is race track located in Italy. Ferrari used this term on several race cars such as the 250 Monza.

N

N.A.R.T.

N.A.R.T. is an abbreviation for North American Racing Team. Luigi Chinetti founded the team in 1958 to promote Ferrari in the United States. Ferrari used this term with the introduction of the 275 GTB/4 NART Spyder. Learn more about Luigi Chinetti. Learn more about NART with the Concise History of N.A.R.T. Book.

P

Plus

Plus refers to the 375 Plus, resembles the lessons Ferrari learned during the 1953 race season and the implemented technical aspects in that car.

 

Purosangue

Purosangue is the name of the upcoming Ferrari SUV, revealed by Ferrari’s head of marketing Enrico Galliera in September 2018. It simply translates to thoroughbred.

 

P2

P2 is an abbreviation for Prototype 2 and refers to racing cars such as the 275 P2 and 330 P2. These were used in the mid-1960s during endurance races.

 

P3

P3 is an abbreviation for Prototype 3 and refers to the Ferrari 330 P3. This car was used in the mid-1960s during endurance races.

 

P4

P4 is an abbreviation for Prototype 4 and refers to the Ferrari 330 P4. This car was used in the mid-1960s during endurance races and was part of the fabulous victory of the 1967 24 Hours of Daytona.

Q

Quattrovalvole

Quattrovalvole is Italian for ‘four valves’. Ferrari used this term with the introduction of the 308 Quattrovalvole, which has four valves per cylinder.

S

Scaglietti

Carrozzeria Scaglietti was an Italian design and coachbuilding company founded by Sergio Scaglietti in 1951. Scaglietti designed a handful of Ferraris produced between 1953 and 1974. Ferrari used this term on the 612 Scaglietti to honour Sergio.

 

Scuderia

Scuderia is Italian for ‘stable’. Ferrari uses this term in their Formula One name and used it with the introduction of the 430 Scuderia

 

Superamerica

Superamerica referred to large grand tourers powered by V12s and sported custom bodywork. These cars were mainly produced for the American market in the 1950s and 1960s.

 

Superfast

Superfast refers to quick grand tourers such as the 500 Superfast.

 

SP

SP is an abbreviation for Special Project. Ferrari uses this term for production cars with unique bodywork such as the SP38 Deborah.

 

Spider

Spider refers to convertible Ferraris. The name was inspired by the Spider Phaeton: a vintage carriage for the gentleman driver.

 

SWB

SWB is an abbreviation for Short Wheelbase. Ferrari used this term on cars with a smaller bodywork than their counterparts, such as the 250 GT Berlinetta SWB.

T TB TB means Transversale Berlinetta and refers to the transverse position of the gearbox in the Ferrari 348 TB.

 

TdF

TdF is an abbreviation for Tour de France. The Tour de France Automobile Race was held between 1899 and 1986 and the Ferrari 250 won on a regular basis. Ferrari used this term with the introduction of the 250 GT Berlinetta ‘Tour de France’ and F12tdf.

 

Testarossa

Testarossa or TR Italian for ‘red head’. Ferrari first used the term with the Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa and referred to the red cam covers.

TF TF refers to the Targa Florio, an open road endurance race first held in 1906 and often won by Ferrari. Although the Ferrari 625 TF wears the Targa Florio tag, it was never entered.

 

TRC

TRC is an abbreviation for Testa Rossa [C Group] and refers to its regulations: special vehicles with any kind of engine and the use of aerodynamic aid is allowed. Ferrari used this term with the introduction of the 500 TRC.

 

TRS

TRS is an abbreviation for Testa Rossa Sam. Ferrari used this term with the introduction of the Special Project F12 TRS.

TS TS means Transversale Spider and refers to the transverse position of the gearbox in the Ferrari 348 TS.

X

XX Program

The XX Program is very limited Ferrari program for clients to get involved into the racing activities, with cars such as the FXX-K. The XX abbreviation is believed to be derived from the Enzo’s codename ‘FX’. With the introduction of the FXX, Ferrari added another ‘X’.

1

16M

16M is an abbreviation for 16 Manufacture. Ferrari used this term on the Scuderia Spider 16M to commemorate the 16th F1 Constructor’s World Championship.